Projects & Reports

Shuttered, Silenced and Censored- Egypt’s Polarized Press Under Military Rule (PDF)

Dec. 17, 2013

Report based on three months of research and original interviews with media scholars and Egyptian journalists and human rights activists. Discusses the worsening state for press freedom and critical thought in the post-Morsi Egypt, as journalistic freedom declined in the face of military restrictions, crackdown on opposing thought and extreme polarization mired in self-censorship. 

 

Self-Censorship and Social Media- The Extremes of Human Rights Coverage in a Transitioning Egypt (PDF)

Oct. 29, 2013

Report based on two months of research and original interviews with media scholars and Egyptian journalists and human rights activists. Discusses the relationship between human rights and the increasingly polarized and censored Egyptian media following the military takeover in July 2013. Also explores the nation’s vibrant social media and increasing discussion of “taboo” issues helping promote human rights coverage. 

 

Impact”- A Youth Literary Magazine Connecting Youth Across Continents and Cultures (PDF)

May 2013

Individual Keystone project culminating two years in the University of Maryland’s living-learning Honors Humanities program. International youth magazine (34 pages) created in Adobe InDesign.

Over two years, youth at a university in Nigeria, a refugee camp in Palestine, a university in Ecuador and a program for immigrant youth at a high school near Washington, D.C. contributed short stories, poems, essays and drawings to this magazine. They explored their unique identities, the issues they found in themselves, their homes or communities and ways they could begin to solve their problems. Through a system of exchange and creative response to other participants’ submissions, the project’s goal was to inspire more understanding about others of different cultures and the realization that people from different places deal with similar problems. In our globalizing world, the ultimate purpose was to foster cross-cultural dialogue about how to collaboratively address common problems.

 


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